Starts:

Thursday, September 22nd
4:30pm-6:00pm EDT

Category:

Topical Workshop

Tracks:

Specific Pain Conditions/Pain in Specific Populations

Room

718 B

Pain in Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is prevalent, and the prevalence is expected to increase in future due to increasing level of obesity and increasing age in the general population. Osteoarthritis is characterized by cartilage degeneration, joint stiffness, and pain. X-ray imaging remains the golden standard to assess cartilage generation, but no to limited association is found comparing x-ray findings and pain reports in osteoarthritis, suggesting that other factors are important for pain in osteoarthritis. This workshop will focus on three major contributors to pain in osteoarthritis namely: 1) cognitive factors (Robert Edwards, USA), 2) local processes in the joint (Hans-Georg Schaible, Germany) and: 3) the nervous system (Kristian Kjær Petersen, Denmark). Each talk will give an in-depth state-of-the-art overview of the contributing factors to pain in osteoarthritis, deal with how the specific factors are associated to treatment outcomes, and provide evidence on the modulation of these factors. Pain in osteoarthritis is complex and often a combination of different factors interacting on each other, which provides a negative impact on the pain experienced by the patient. Each speaker will focus on a specific subarea of pain in osteoarthritis, but will bring in examples of other factors of interest (such as comorbidities, genetics, or demographic data).

Presentations

Time
12:30pm EDT2:00pm EDT

Pain in Osteoarthritis – Current Knowledge and Future Directions

Tracks: Specific Pain Conditions/Pain In Specific Populations
Categories: Topical Workshop

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, with rising prevalence due to increasing level of obesity and increasing age in the general population. Osteoarthritis is characterized by pathology in numerous joint tissues, joint pain, functional limitations, and stiffness. X-ray imaging remains the gold standard to assess presence of osteoarthritis, but there is a well-recognized so-called structure-symptom discordance in osteoarthritis, suggesting that other factors are important for pain in osteoarthritis.
This workshop will focus on three major contributors to pain in osteoarthritis namely: 1) cognitive factors (Robert Edwards, USA), 2) local processes in the joint (Hans-Georg Schaible, Germany) and: 3) the nervous system (Tuhina Neogi, USA). Each talk will give an in-depth state-of-the-art overview of the contributing factors to pain in osteoarthritis, deal with how the specific factors are associated to treatment outcomes, and provide evidence on the modulation of these factors.
Pain in osteoarthritis is complex and often a combination of different factors interacting on each other, which provides a negative impact on the pain experienced by the patient. Each speaker will focus on a specific subarea of pain in osteoarthritis, but will bring in examples of other factors of interest (such as comorbidities, genetics, or demographic data).

4:30pm EDT6:00pm EDT

Biopsychosocial Contributions to Osteoarthritis Pain: Current Understanding and Future Directions

Tracks: Specific Pain Conditions/Pain In Specific Populations
Categories: Topical Workshop
Presented By: Dr. Robert R. Edwards

Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is among the most prevalent conditions causing persistent pain and disability and around the world. While we have learned a great deal about OA-related pain mechanisms, objective indices of OA disease severity (e.g., radiographic measures of joint damage) bear little relationship to patient-reported OA symptomatology. Psychosocial factors are important contributors to the severity and impact of OA-related pain; they predict the longitudinal trajectory of pain symptoms, the outcomes of OA treatments, and the course of pain after invasive interventions such as total joint replacement. This presentation will highlight recent findings from studies of cognitive, affective, and social factors that contribute to individual differences in osteoarthritis-related outcomes. Dr. Edwards will highlight some of the mechanistic pathways by which psychosocial factors shape the trajectory of OA pain, and he will focus on both “risk” factors that contribute to deleterious OA outcomes (e.g., pain-related catastrophizing) and “resilience” factors that appear to promote reductions in pain and improvements in functioning (e.g., social support).

4:30pm EDT6:00pm EDT

Local Disease Processes in the Joint Contributing to Osteoarthritis Pain

Tracks: Specific Pain Conditions/Pain In Specific Populations
Categories: Topical Workshop

Dr. Schaible will describe local factors in the joint which determine the occurrence and intensity of pain in the osteoarthritic knee joint in patients undergoing knee arthroplasty. He will address the role of inflammation and bone marrow lesions, the contribution of chondrocytes to inflammatory changes, and the alterations of the innervation of the joint. Furthermore, he will address the role of obesity and diabetes mellitus in regulating pain intensity. Finally, he will show data on the role of cytokines in osteoarthritis and osteoarthritis pain. This talk will provide the audience with an understanding of the pathological processes in the human knee joint which contribute to osteoarthritis pain.

Presenters

Dr. Robert R. Edwards

Associate Professor
The Brigham and Women's Hospital

Dr. Tuhina Neogi

Professor of Medicine, Chief of Rheumatology
Division of Rheumatology, Boston University School of Medicine

Kristian Kjaer Petersen

Associate Professor
Aalborg University

Professor Hans-Georg Schaible

Director
University Hospital Jena